Batch – A Book Review + a Giveaway

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We have been enjoying the quality content of the Well Preserved blog for some time now, and are so pleased to carry Batch - a very tangible result of Joel MacCharles & Dana Harrison’s adventures with food and preserving.

Batch Cover

In Batch, they have created an incredibly useful & enjoyable resource and have given a new meaning to the term “batch” when it comes to preserving. I honestly didn’t fully grasp the manner in which they used it until I actually had my first copy in hand and spent some time perusing the pages. Don’t be fooled by the amazing images and illustrations by Dana – this is not just another pretty recipe book to grace your kitchen counter or coffee table.

Simply said;  It is brilliant!

In the book, “batch” refers to the grouping of preservation methods or processes for a given item. The 7 processes include both waterbath and pressure canning, dehydrating, fermenting, infusing, cellaring (a variety of cold storage methods) and salting & smoking.

Something that struck me with Batch was its very intentional nature and a more holistic perception of preserving. Yes, many folks are putting up large traditional batches of staples for their pantry, but there are also many  people who are turning to preserving as part of their desire to use what they have in the best possible ways, to add more variety to their preserving, to make more from scratch, to waste less while enjoying the process and not feel like you’ve spent the entire day over a steaming kettle.  It is clear that they want to help you feel very productive and proud of what you’ve accomplished in your kitchen, no matter how humble it may be!

So, how do they accomplish all of this?

Within most sections, you will find the following:  (I’ll use the Peach section as an example.)Batch Fillmore Container

  • Tips on preserving nose-to-tail & storing items for the short term
  • Several processes that can be prepped in 10 minutes or less. (Peach Creme Fraiche, Peach Salt, Instant Hot Sauce)
  • Batch-It recipes:  These are 2 or more recipes that start out with the same treatment (both the Smoked-Dried Peaches and the Canned Peach Slices begin by scorching 8 lbs of peaches which will be divided; 3/4 of them for canning, the remainder for smoking followed by dehydrating…see an example below.)
  • Canning Recipe as a result of cooking down the fruits (Peach-Bourbon BBQ Sauce…see recipe below.)
  • Main dish &/or side or dessert recipe that utilizes 1 or more of the items in the prior preserving. (Finger-licking Ribs with Peach-Bourbon BBQ Sauce, Dr. Stanwisk’s Apple Galette with Peach Creme Fraiche)
Peache Recipes - BATCH

Photo credit: Reena Newman

To celebrate this beautiful book, we’ve received special permission from Dana and Joel to share some of the recipes from the Peach section of the book. This excerpt shows how useful the Batch-It recipes are at teaching you to multi-task preserving efforts.

Batch -Canned Peach Slices2

What’s even better than us trying to describe the genius of this book, is for Dana and Joel to do it for us. Listen to what they have to see in this quick video below.

If you want to hear more directly from Dana & Joel, watch this Facebook Live video of Joel making Kimchi!

Peach-Bourbon BBQ Sauce

Excerpted from Batch: Over 200 recipes and Techniques for a Well-Preserved Kitchen. Copyright © 2016 Joel MacCharles and Dana Harrison. Published by Appetite by Random House, a division of Random House of Canada Limited, a Penguin Random House Company. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved.

The smoky flavors in this BBQ sauce come from a combination of lightly roasting the peaches and adding chipotle powder. We discovered  the magic of ground chipotles while on vacation  with our dear friends “the Pauls” a few years ago. This recipe is a tribute to them.

Yield: 4-5 half pint jars

Ingredients:

5 lb peaches, about 17–21 peachesChipotle Peppers & Calicutts Spice
¼ cup brown sugar,  lightly packed
1 cup minced onion
5 cloves garlic, minced
1-inch piece ginger, minced
1¾ cups cider vinegar
½ cup honey
¼ cup bourbon
1½ Tbsp  smoked paprika
2½ tsp salt
2½ tsp chipotle powder (grind whole chipotles if you don’t have any)

  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F.
  2. Cut the peaches in half and place on a rimmed baking sheet cut side up. Scatter the brown sugar over top. Roast until the peaches just begin to brown, 35– 40 minutes.Roasted Peaches
  3. Place the peaches, including any peach juice created during roasting, in a large pot. Add the onion, garlic, ginger, vine- gar, honey, bourbon, paprika, salt, and chipotle powder and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Mash the peaches as they cook and keep at a simmer until the sauce reduces and thickens by half, about 15 minutes. Leave the sauce chunky or blend it smooth with an immersion blender.
  4. Prepare your canning pot and rack, and sterilize your jars and lids (see page 17).
  5. Continue to reduce the sauce until it’s as thick as you want it.
  6. Remove the jars from the canner and turn the heat to high.
  7. Fill the jars with the sauce, leaving ½ inch of headspace.
  8. Gently jostle the jars or use the handle of a spoon to release any air bubbles.
  9. Wipe the rims of the jars, apply the lids, and process for 20 minutes (if you live higher than 1,000 feet above sea level, refer to the Adjust for Altitude chart on page 17 for additional processing time). Remove the jars and allow them to cool. Store in a dark, cool place in your kitchen.

Peach BBQ Sauce in JarsVA R I AT I O N S : You can roast the peaches on the BBQ to increase the smoke flavor, but you will lose some of the precious juices. Replace the honey with 2½ cups brown sugar for a more traditional BBQ sauce.

Put this BBQ Sauce recipe to use in Batch’s recipe for Finger-Lickin’ Ribs.

 

 

 

Giveaway

One lucky winner will receive their very own copy of Batch, along with a case of Orchard Road wide mouth pint and quart jars, and bands and lids. Enter below.

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Can-It-Forward Day 2016

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cifd-badgeCan-It-Forward Day will take place on Friday, July 22nd. Now in its 6th year, Can-It-Forward Day was born from the desire to share – or pay forward – the joy and benefits of canning, bringing together canners, gardeners and food enthusiasts alike.  Sounds pretty great to us!

Interested preservers can watch Canning demonstrations from popular canning bloggers including Marisa McClellan of Food in Jars, and Malia Karlinsky of Yesterday on Tuesday, as well as the Ball brand’s expert chefs will take place from 10:00AM – 3:30PM ET on the Ball Canning Facebook page via Facebook Live.

Some of the recipes featured during the Facebook Live event will include, Apricot Lavender Jam, Spicy Heirloom Tomato Chutney, Green Tomato Pickles, Fiesta Peppers, Chipotle Peach Salsa, and more.Ball Jars Fillmore Container

This year the event has a big focus on charity. Five small, local, non-profit organizations have been selected with the help of participating bloggers to benefit from the event. For every like, share, reaction and comment on the Can-It-Forward Day Facebook Live videos on July 22, Ball Canning will donate $1 to the following local charities:

If you want to participate Can-It-Forward Day here’s a few fun ideas on how to join in on the preserving fun!

  • Enter your chance to win a $50 store credit to Fillmore Container (use Rafflecopter widget below).
  • Post a picture of your preserved goods with #canitforward #fillmorejars.
  • Pledge to can-it-forward by signing up via the pledge page and share with friends.
  • Tune in on July 22nd to watch canning demonstrations via Facebook Live from 10:00AM – 3:30PM ET. Each hour, viewers will have the chance to win a giveaway prize! Be sure to share the videos with your friends!
  • Engage with any of the Facebook Live recipe videos and Ball Canning will make a donation to charity.

 

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Lemony Dill Zucchini Salad

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Another good thing to do with Zucchini

Most summers, the zucchini availability becomes a laughing matter…because we get so many that we’re all trying to give them away! We’ve learned to enjoy them roasted or grilled, sautéed, and as raw cubes in salads or raw fry strips in veggie trays. This week, I made this new Lemony Dill Zucchini Salad…and it was a big hit! So, here’s the recipe! It is crazy simple and quite flexible.

You’ll notice that I don’t have measurements. Don’t let that scare you! I’d suggest that you start slicing away until you think you have enough, they adjust the dressing accordingly. It does last well, so while you’re making a batch for that pot-luck, work in a little extra to be sure you have some for a couple of sides throughout the week.

Lemony Dill Zucchini Salad

Slicing 

Slice small to medium sized zucchini as thin as you’re able. For visual interest, length-wise slices are lovely, as is the addition of some yellow squash. A couple of slicing tips: I used my mandolin slicer…makes this super easy. After cutting and discarding the ends, cut the zucchini in half length-wise. I then started slicing with that wide cut side down…which helped me avoid fighting with that last slice that ended up being mostly skin. (This can go to the chickens if you’re choosy about your strips). Optional – small onion or spring onion to your preference.

Salting & Drawing of Water

As I sliced each half, I then layered them in a large deep pan (something like a lasagna pan size) and sprinkled coarse salt on every other layer. The layered salting made it so I didn’t have to do any stirring or shushling, so I didn’t end up breaking those pretty ribbons! Cover and set in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to an hour. Pour off the fluid, rinse well with cold water to remove excess salt and drain well. The more fluid you remove at this point, the more quickly and completely they will soak up the flavors in the dressing.

Dressing

Lemony Dill Zucchini Salad Dressing Base

This can be done while you’re waiting for the drawing of water to happen and is so simple I call it my one jar wonder. In a mason jar, mix equal parts Olive Oil and Lemon Juice and shake well. Then, add one clove of garlic, sliced in a couple of large chunks so that they can be removed if you wish before serving. You can add some other herbs like Dill or Mint – really whatever your favorites are. I like to add some at this point for marinating flavor and then reserve some to sprinkle in prior to serving. Pour the dressing over the drained zucchini (and optional onion) and allow to set in the refrigerator for at least an hour. You can make this the day before – it will simply continue to soak in those wonderful flavors.

If you like this salad, you might also enjoy Maw Maw’s Cucumber Salad or Gigi’s Copper Penny Salad found here.

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Ball Canning Jars and New Preserving Tools

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We’ve been fans of Ball Canning for quite awhile. We are avid users of their canning products, and of course we carry a large selection of their products too.  This summer, Ball Canning, has introduced some pretty cool new tools and products that will motivate you to try something new and help you preserve more!

Interactive-Canning-Map-JuneWe love this new Interactive Canning Map. It shows the various regions of the country and what’s currently in season in those areas. Clicking on the various images of fruits and vegetables will take you to preserving recipes that utilize those ingredients. If you need help calculating the pectin you need for your jam or jelly, use this handy pectin calculator. If you’re new to canning, this simple pH chart will give you guidance on pH and which preserving method will be needed. Making jelly without pectin? You can use this sheet test to determine if you’ve reached the gelling point.

Meet Ball’s Fresh Preservers team, they include two of our favorite ladies – Marisa McClellan and Malia Karlinsky. You’ll find new recipes for summer preserves that the Fresh Preserve team has created specifically for Ball, like this Blackberry Lavender Jam. If you want more recipes and ideas, the two most recent  Ball Blue Books are great resources to have in hand. You can also check out Ball’s Tumblr, called Freshly Preserved Ideas.Ball Blue_Book

Jarden Home Brands (parent company of Ball Canning) shared some survey results with us that were pretty impressive. They found that 40% of gardeners plan to preserve half or more of the food they grow this season and 44% freeze it for later use. A whopping 77% of gardeners have canned, frozen or dehydrated foods to preserve them, and 33% of those preserving gardeners are millennials.

We are often asked which Ball products we carry, so we’ve put a list together for you.

Ball Wide Mouth Jars

Ball’s traditional canning jar with the Ball signature imprinted on the front of the jar is available in 16oz, and 24oz, 32oz, 64oz.

Widemouth Jars Fillmore Container

The Elite Collection also offers two unique squat style jars in a wide mouth opening. Available in an 8oz., and 16oz; as well as this 8oz Kerr jar, which is made by Ball.

EliteBall Jars Fillmore ContainerWM Ball Regular Mouth Jars

Ball’s Quilted jelly jars offer a traditional look and are an old favorite with canners. The quilted line of jars are available in 4oz, 8oz, and 12oz. and come with bands and lids.

QuiltedJarsRegularMouth-FillmoreContainer

 

 

Ball’s traditional canning jar with the Ball signature imprinted on the front of the jar with tapered shoulders is available in 16oz, and 32 oz.

RM-Ball Fillmore ContainerBall Collection Jars

The past few years, Ball’s been creating specialty jars that offer a different style or color than traditional canning jars. They are still safe for canning, but they are just as pretty to look at, as they are to fill!

Collection Elite
The Collection Elite color series jars were released last year, and we understand they are here to stay. The never-before released sizes in blue glass include – 8oz. regular mouth, 16oz. wide mouth and 32oz. wide mouth jars. Each jar is made in the USA of colored glass and is safe for water bath canning, pressure canning and food storage. Learn more about these jars here.

BlueJarBall-Fillmore Container

Also introduced in this collection is a clear glass vintage style regular mouth 8oz jam jar. The jar sports a squat shape and is covered with a variety of embossed fruits styled jars and is available in regular mouth.

Ball Vintage Jam JAR_FillmoreContainer

Heritage Collection was a special release jar that was launched with a blue jar, then green, and now all that’s left of this limited collection is purple. Get them now, before we run out. Available in 16oz, and 32oz. in both regular mouth and wide mouth.

PurpleJars-FillmoreContainer

Ball Lids

All of Ball’s jars come packaged with bands and lids, but if you need fresh lids they are available in a 24-pack. Ball’s plastic storage lids are also a nice one-piece option when storing open jars in the fridge. If you do a lot of canning, consider purchasing  our bulk flats, available in both regular and wide mouth. They are manufactured by Ball, but are unmarked.

Ball Freeze Safe Jars

If you plan to freeze in your jars, but sure you are using jars that are freezer safe.  Check out the chart below to identify which jars are best for freezing. To read more about how to freeze in jars safely, read this post.

Freezer Safe jar chart

If you’re not comfortable freezing in glass try Ball’s Plastic Freezer Jars – available in 16oz. & 8oz. sizes.

BallFreezerSafePlastic-FillmoreContainer

Are we missing a Ball jar that you love? Unfortunately, we can’t carry every single jar from Ball and here’s why:

  • Ball’s entire line is not available to us through our supplier. Some of them are ear-marked for non-USA markets.
  • Some items would be duplicates of what we carry in a more economical and/or more versatile version.

Sometimes we are able to bring items in as a special order, but there is usually a minimum quantity expected in order to do so and a greater lead time. If there is a particular item that you’re interested in, feel free to ask by emailing info@filmorecontainer.com with the details.

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Savory Spiced-Mango Conserve

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Pomona's Ball iLid Giveaway1Congratulations to Fillmore Container customers – Brian and Kristina Lehmbeck of Ashburn, VA who host the Mamma Rocks the Kitchen food blog, and Sharon Sciortino of Crystal Lake, IL.

They are the lucky winners of the June Jamming Giveaway with Pomona’s Pectin. Both winners will receive a copy of Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin and a box of Pectin from Pomona’s; and a case of 4 fruited Ball Collection Elite 8-oz jelly jars with bands and lids and one plastic storage iLID from us.

For those of you that didn’t win, please enjoy this bonus recipe for Savory Spiced-Mango Conserve, excerpted from Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin by Allison Carroll Duffy (Fair Winds Press, June 2013).

Savory Spiced-Mango Conserve

Allison says: “If you’re a fan of chutney, give this conserve a try! Inspired by the classic Indian condiment, this conserve melds the sweetness of mangoes with the earthy, complex flavors of garlic, ginger, and a variety of other spices. Remember, for canning safety, it’s important that you do not increase the quantities of any of the vegetables or spices in this recipe, and be sure to use bottled lemon juice.”

Before You Begin:

Prepare calcium water. To do this, combine ½ teaspoon calcium powder (in the small packet in your box of Pomona’s pectin) with ½ cup water in a small, clear jar with a lid. Shake well. Extra calcium water may be stored in the refrigerator for future use.

Wondering what calcium water is? Calcium water is a solution of the monocalcium phosphate powder (food-grade rock mineral source) that comes in its own packet with every purchase of Pomona’s Pectin. The Pomona’s Pectin directions tell you how to make calcium water with the calcium powder. Pomona’s Pectin recipes call for calcium water because the pectin is activated by calcium, not by sugar. You can read more about calcium water here.

Yield: 4 to 5 cupssavoryspicedmangoconserve

Ingredients

2 pounds ripe, firm mangoes*
2/3 cup diced onion
2 teaspoons peeled, finely grated ginger root
1 teaspoon minced garlic
¾ cup water
¾ cup white vinegar
½ cup golden raisins (or dark raisins, if you prefer)
1½ teaspoons ground coriander
1 teaspoon mustard seed
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon ground turmeric
¼ teaspoon ground cumin
1/8 teaspoon hot pepper flakes
¼ teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons lemon juice
2 teaspoons calcium water**
1 1/3 cups sugar
2 teaspoons Pomona’s pectin powder

Savory Spiced-Mango Conserve Directions

1. Wash your jars, lids, and bands. Place jars in canner, fill canner 2/3 full with water, bring canner to a rolling boil, and boil jars for 10 minutes to sterilize them. (Add 1 extra minute of sterilizing time for every 1000 feet above sea level.) Reduce heat and allow jars to remain in hot canner water until ready to use. Place lids in water in a small sauce pan, heat to a low simmer, and hold until ready to use.

2. Peel, pit, and dice mangoes.

3. In a saucepan, combine mangoes, onion, ginger, garlic, the ¾ cup water, vinegar, raisins, coriander, mustard seeds, cinnamon, turmeric, cumin, hot pepper flakes, and salt. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat, and then simmer, covered, for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat.

4. Measure 4 cups of the cooked mango mixture (saving any extra for another use), and return the measured quantity to the saucepan. Add the lemon juice and calcium water and mix well.

5. In a separate bowl, combine sugar and pectin powder. Mix thoroughly and set aside.

6. Bring the mango mixture back to a full boil over high heat. Slowly add sugar-pectin mixture, stirring constantly. Continue to stir vigorously for 1 to 2 minutes to dissolve pectin while the conserve comes back up to a boil. Once the conserve returns to a full boil, remove it from the heat.

7. Can Your Conserve: Remove jars from canner and ladle hot conserve into hot jars, leaving ¼ inch of headspace. Remove trapped air bubbles, wipe rims with a damp cloth, put on lids and screw bands, and tighten to fingertip tight. Lower filled jars into canner, ensuring jars are not touching each other and are covered with at least 1 to 2 inches of water. Place lid on canner, return to a rolling boil, and process for 10 minutes (adjusting for altitude if necessary). Turn off heat and allow canner to sit untouched for 5 minutes, then remove jars and allow to cool undisturbed for 12 to 24 hours. Confirm that jars have sealed, then store properly.

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Using Lavender in a Preserver’s Kitchen

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Lavender Blossom Banner

Lavender-Jelly Fillmore Container

We made Lavender Jelly with Pomona’s Pectin earlier this year and were happy with how easy it was and delighted in the color and flavor!

It got rave reviews by many of the Farm Show attendees, who also thought it would be perfect in an elegant brunch spread or as shower favors.

Lavender’s subtle aromatic nature makes it a lovely addition to jams & preserves and pairs beautifully with both the sweet and savory recipes.

 

 

Preserves with a nuance of Lavender that have grabbed our attention:

Red Pear Lavender Jam Food in Jars

Photo Credit:
Marisa McClellan
Food in Jars

Here are some ways to let Lavender influence that “extra” produce  that quickly gets transformed into an impromptu baked delight, and infusion or a refreshing beverage:

A few things to consider:

Quality matters!  When sourcing your lavender, be sure to get food grade. We choose to use a source as close to us – Hope Hill Lavender Farm. As it is with all produce, knowing & trusting your grower usually means a higher quality product. If you see a bulk jar of lavender that isn’t marked as food grade, don’t be afraid to ask. Chances are, if they don’t’ know where it comes from, it isn’t food grade.  Although you may need to do a little research to find your best local source, this U.S. Lavender Farm Directory may help you get started.

Go Small!  When trying new flavor combinations for the first time, or if you’re planning to gift them, it’s a wise idea to use smaller jam jars. This way, if it’s not a recipe that gets devoured upon opening, you’ll be more likely to get through it before it spoils. The same would apply for ones you’re gifting. It also allows you to share the joy of a single batch more easily.  We’d recommend the 4oz smooth-sided or 4oz Quilted jars for regular use. Many of our customers also use the 1.5oz sample jars, which are a great way to share these new flavors; however, they aren’t compatible with the 2-piece lids. (You can learn more about using lug lids or single-piece lids here.)

New Lavender Plants

 

If you’ve got a green thumb, or are just lucky enough to have thriving Lavender plants, here are tips on how to harvest and dry it, along with some other ways to enjoy those fragrant buds.

We just added some new plantings to form a hedge along our garden. I’m now looking forward to next summer when they’ll be blooming!

We’d love to hear from you! What is your favorite way to use Lavender in your kitchen?

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Low Sugar Jam Recipes and a Pomona’s Pectin Giveaway

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Pomona's Pectin & Preserving with Pomona's Pectin BookThe makers of Pomona’s Universal Pectin are jumping into jamming season with a giveaway and we’ve partnered with them by adding some vintage style jam jars and an iLid to the prize pack. Enter your chance to win at the end of this post, or over at Pomona’s.

If you aren’t familiar, Pomona’s Pectin is a sugar-free, preservative-free, low-methoxyl citrus pectin that does not require sugar to jell. It enables you to make jams and jellies with little or no sugar, allowing you to make a healthier version of your preserves. For those of us that love to jam, but are trying to reduce the amount of sugar in your diet, Pomona’s is the way to go. To learn more about making low sugar or sugar-free jam with Pomona’s read this, or consider getting the book Preserving with Pomona’s Pectin.

In honor of Pomona’s and jamming season we’ve pulled together a few of our favorite jam and jelly recipes that use Pomona’s, and check out the Pomona’s blog for a Strawberry Prosecco Jelly recipe.

Pomona’s Pectin Recipe Round-UpPomona'sRecipeCollage1

Plum-Strawberry-Rosemary Jam

Strawberry Rhubarb Jam

Strawberry Vanilla Preserves

Strawberry Jam

Low Sugar Strawberry Vanilla Jam

Blubarb Jam

Maple-Vanilla Peach Jam

Sweet Cherry Vanilla Jam

Pear-Cranberry Conserve with Almonds and Crystallized Ginger

Pear Vanilla Jam with Honey

Cranberry-Habanero Jelly

Sunrise Marmalade

Gingered Lemon-Fig Preserves

Amish Christmas Jam

Mulled Merry Merlot Jam

GIVEAWAY

Two lucky winners will receive Preserving with Pomona’s book, and a box of Pomona’s Pectin from the folks at Pomona’s; And a case (4 jars) of Vintage Style Jam Jars with bands and lids, along with an iLid for capping an open jam of jar, or storing calcium water (winner chooses iLid color) from Fillmore Container.  Enter BelowPomona's Ball iLid Giveaway1

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Wholesale Paper Straws, Party Supplies, Inspiration for Summer Celebrations and a Giveaway!

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Just in time for summer we’re introducing tons of great new paper straw designs and new pricing! Plus great ideas, from Yesterday on Tuesday, for Father’s Day and 4th of July, not to mention TWO GIVEAWAYS!Mason Jar Festive Collage

We now carry over 40 paper straw designs/colors! From polka dots, to gingham, to chevron, to stars and stripes, to camo and cow print, solid colors and so much more. BLOGNew Designs Straws Large Group

Our paper straws are made from FDA approved materials and non-toxic, food contact safe inks and made in the USA. You can learn more about why our paper straws are safe and eco-friendly here.Cow and Gingham and Solid Black Straws Fillmore Container

Our paper straws are available in a variety of quantities from single straws to wholesale bulk amounts. Bulk paper straws are perfect for complimenting drinks at birthday parties, weddings & showers, anniversaries, graduation parties or homecoming events! Or even for resale in a retail store.

Chevron, Dots, Mini Dots, Pencil Stripe Straws Fillmore Container Close

We are giving away 2 jars of 48 paper straws to two lucky winners. Winners get to choose the paper straw pattern. See details to enter at end of the post.

Our friend Malia at Yesterday on Tuesday came up with some cute ideas for celebrating the 4th of July with our patriotic straws, Mason jar mugs and beverage dispenser. Find out how she made these yummy drinks and enter to win a $50 store credit to Fillmore Container over on her blog.

4th of July Straws Mugs drink

4th of July Mason Jar Dispenser

If you want to make this ‘camotastic’ gift for Dad. You can order the camo lids and straws here, pick your mugs here, and get the free printable Father’s Day Mason Jar Labels designed by Yesterday on Tuesday.

Father's Day Camo Mug

 GIVEAWAY

Two lucky winners will receive 2 jars of 48 straws. The design and color of the straws is the winners choice. Enter below. Don’t forget to head over to Yesterday on Tuesday to enter another giveaway for $50 store credit, good towards any purchase at FillmoreContainer.com. Good Luck!

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How to Use an Atmospheric Steam Canner

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New News on the Use of Steam Canners!

There has been more research attention given to the use of Atmospheric Steam Canners recently and several reliable sources are now stating that it is indeed safe to use them under certain circumstances as an alternative to a Water bath canner.  Our local experts from the Penn State Extension Office shared this information in their most recent Newsletter and the local newspaper Lancaster Online recently covered this news and has created a wonderful video   in which Marth Zepp walks you through the process of using a Steam Bath Canner and touches on some important reminders.

If you’re close to the Lancaster Area, you may want to attend the Workshop on Steam Canning in June!

Atmospheric steam canner

Photo Credit : Penn State Extension; Lancaster

“An atmospheric steam canner can be an alternative to a boiling water canner. Use a steam canner only to process high acid foods such as peaches, pears, and apples, or acidified foods such as pickles and relishes. Foods must be high in acid with a pH of 4.6 or below.

Use a research tested recipe developed for a boiling water canner from an approved source such as USDA recipes or from Penn State Extension. The booklet accompanying an atmospheric steam canner can’t be relied on to provide safe canning instructions or process times.

Use standard canning jars with 2-piece metal lids.

Jars must be heated prior to filling just as in other forms of processing.

A rack should be in the base of the canner to lift the jars above the water.

Fill the base of the steam canner with 2 to 2½ quarts of water. Heat. As each jar is filled, place it on the rack and replace the cover until all jars are filled.

Jars must be processed in pure steam at 212°F. Watch for venting prior to starting the processing time. Turn the heat on high under the canner, and watch for a full column of steam 6 to 8 inches long flowing from the vent hole(s). Once you see full venting, begin timing the process. Steam has to flow freely from the canner vent(s) during the entire process or the food is considered under-processed and unsafe.

Regulate burner heat so that the canner maintains a steady flow of steam and a temperature of 212°F. A canner that is boiling too vigorously can boil dry within 20 minutes. If a canner boils dry, the canner can be damaged and the food is considered under-processed and potentially unsafe.

Adjust processing time for higher elevations as required by a tested recipe.

Processing time must not exceed 45 minutes including any modification for elevation because the canner could boil dry.

Do not open the canner during processing— steam will escape and the temperature will be lowered.

When processing time is complete, remove the lid. Allow jars to sit in the canner for five minutes; then remove to a towel covered counter away from drafts. Allow jars to cool naturally—don’t force cool jars.

Before canning your first load of food, do a dry run to practice maintaining a steady stream of steam.

As with any canning, steam will be produced. It is best to have adequate ventilation to allow excess steam to escape from the room.”

 

 

The National Center for Home Food Preservation also put out a statement on the practice.

You can find the full Let’s Preserve Newsletter from our local Penn State Extension Office which includes many other tips on preserving and food safety here.

Gift Ideas for Teachers

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The school year is soon coming to a close, and we’ve been on the hunt for some fun ways to say “thank you” to the teachers who encourage our kids to love learning all school year long.

Teacher Thank You Gifts

Sweet Treats

This Ice Cream themed teacher’s gift is the perfect way to send that special teacher sailing into summer vacation. Malia of Yesterday on Tuesday used our Heritage Hill Jars to put together this ice cream themed gift. Plus, she has free printables so you can put this gift together in a snap!Ice Cream Themed Teacher Appreciation Gift and Printables

Dig in the Dirt

Get your kids digging in the dirt and make a Terrarium for that special teacher. It’s a low maintenance gift that any Teacher can enjoy at home, or in their classroom when school starts again. Use a jar you have on hand, or chose from one of these. A little gnome or kid painted rock can transform the terrarium into a customized garden that sums up a year of thanks. Get step-by-step on how to make a teacher terrarium here. If you have multiple teachers to gift too, a smaller planting project, might be the way to go.InglenookTer1 - Containers

Get Cooking

If  your kid’s teachers like to grill? Then make him/her some Spice rubs. This project is so easy the kids can do it. Have them make a double batch and your pantry will be stocked for grill season too.Cocoa Spice Rub RecipeLet There be Light

Take the kids on a nature hunt in your back yard and make a Mason jar lantern for that teacher that plans to hang out on their back porch all summer. Fill it with Citronella to keep those pesky bugs away!
Mason Jar Sea Shell Lantern

Make Some Jam

Whip up a batch of your favorite jam and have the kids make some homemade labels. Need some jam recipe ideas? You’re sure to find something in our recipe file.

kid decorated jar labels

Smelling Sweet

What teacher doesn’t want to pamper herself over the summer? Gift her some homemade bath and body products to recharge over the summer. Don’t have time to make your own, we have a few favorites here.
Candle Bath & Body Fillmore Container

Want more ideas? Check out our Teacher Appreciation & Classmate Ideas board on Pinterest.

eacherPinterest Board